SciWorks opening on November 12th

November 29th, 2011

“Our Expanding Oceans” is open at SciWorks until February 25th, 2012, and will travel to other locations afterwards. Elizabeth LaBar took these beautiful photos of the exhibit.

SciWorks is located at 400 Hanes Mill Rd. Winston-Salem, NC 27105. Call 336-767-6730 for more information.

SciWorks in Winston-Salem hosts global climate change events, opening November 11th

October 31st, 2011

Book Signing and Opening Reception for Seasons of Change and Our Expanding Oceans
Friday, November 11, 2011 – 6:00pm – 8:00pm

on exhibit November 12 – February 25

Seasons of Change: Global Warming in Your Backyard explores some of the specific regional impacts from global climate change.

Blending art and science into a comprehensive educational experience, Our Expanding Oceans will amaze, inspire, and inform.  Artist Mary Edna Fraser and geologist Orrin Pilkey explore the major elements of global climate change with an emphasis on melting ice and rising seas.  More than 60 dyed silk batiks depict aerial, satellite, and cartographic perspectives of our environment, producing stunning panoramas permeated with color. Written interpretation by Fraser and Pilkey accompanies the large scale silks.

Batik Artist Mary Edna Fraser and Dr. Orrin Pilkey will be the special guests this evening, and will be available for signings of their book Global Climate Change: A Primer (Duke University Press) co-authored by Orrin and Keith Pilkey with art by Mary Edna Fraser.  This is an “adults only” event; adult beverages will be served.  Tickets will be available through 11/9 at SciWorks front desk or by calling 336-714-7110, $20 per person.  RSVP by 11/9.

SciWorks
400 Hanes Mill Rd.
Winston-Salem, NC 27105

State of Change blog covers “Our Expanding Oceans”

October 4th, 2011

States of Change, a blog by Climate Central, has posted an extensive article about my work: From the Front Lines of Climate: Mary Edna Fraser.

Climate Central is an independent, non-profit journalism and research organization. They are dedicated to connecting mainstream America with the realities of climate change.  Their content has been broadcast, published, or otherwise used by organizations including PBS, The Weather Channel, The New York Times, NPR, The Washington Post, MSNBC, TIME.com, Scientific American, Parade, and National Geographic.

Not Just For Dorm Rooms: Batik Hangings Show Eco Catastrophes

August 18th, 2011

Yukon Delta, 44" x 44", batik on silk

John Pavlus wrote a beautiful article titled Not Just For Dorm Rooms: Batik Hangings Show Eco Catastrophes about my batiks in Global Climate Change: A Primer for Fast Co. Design, New York. It features a video that shows all the batiks in the exhibit at the North Carolina Museum of Art, Raleigh.

Expanding coverage of “Global Climate Change”

August 17th, 2011

Global Climate Change: A Primer has gotten an abundance of recent media exposure, including:
“Duke professor Orrin Pilkey takes on the deniers in Global Climate Change: A Primer”, Independent Weekly, Durham, NC, by Gerry Canavan
“The art of climate change”, CNET News, by Leslie Katz
“Authors present climate change argument”, Salisbury Post, NC, by Deirdre Parker Smith
“Expanding Oceans: Batiks of Mary Edna Fraser”, Deep Blue Home, by Julia Whitty
“Rising Oceans, a Story in Batik”, Mother Jones, San Francisco, by Julia Whitty

Installation of "Our Expanding Oceans" at the North Carolina Museum of Natural Sciences, Raleigh

Mary Edna and John Sperry observe "Global Perception"

Review of Our Expanding Oceans

June 29th, 2011

Something pretty from something ugly: climate change by David Menconi, from the News Observer, Chapel Hill, NC, June 26, 2011

The first rule of storytelling is show, don’t tell. And it’s hard to imagine a better example than “Our Expanding Oceans,” a new visual-art exhibit that shows planet’s seas and waterways rising.

The exhibit is based on a new book, “Global Climate Change: A Primer,” written by renowned climate scientist Orrin Pilkey with his son Keith Pilkey. And to visually make the point about the effects of climate change, the book is illustrated with Mary Edna Fraser’s striking batik paintings. Fraser’s full-size originals make up the exhibit at the N.C. Museum of Natural Sciences in Raleigh.

“How I approach art and how Orrin approaches science are so different,” Fraser said on a recent morning, during a break from setting up her paintings for this weekend’s opening. “He and I will argue and argue and argue until we come up with an image that portrays the relevant scientific laws in a way that’s pertinent, visually and emotionally.”

“An ugly picture is not going to get the point across,” Fraser said. “This makes a difficult subject more palatable. Art speaks loudly.”

Of course, there are those who deny global warming – “The Global Warming Denial Lobby,” in Pilkey’s parlance in the book. “Our Expanding Oceans” invites you to see it with your own eyes.

More than 50 paintings make up the exhibit. Not all are directly tied to climate change. Paintings depict an iceberg, Mount Kilimanjaro and underwater wildlife around Australia’s Great Barrier Reef.

But the most attention-getting works are the ones that give a sense of changes resulting from global warming.

One depicts how much of the South Carolina coast (including Fraser’s hometown of Charleston) will be underwater by the year 2100, based on projections from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration.

Another is a startling before-and-after view of the widening of the Mississippi and Missouri rivers around St. Louis over a five-year period. And one eye-catching painting contrasts shades of orange, green and blue in a way that suddenly seems less lovely once you realize it’s a rendition of BP’s Deep Horizon oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico.

“That’s something pretty, and it came out of something that was pretty ugly,” Fraser said of the oil spill picture.

Fraser is a master dyer in batik, a type of painting that predates the Middle Ages. She draws each picture on cloth with pencil and applies wax and dye before setting it with an iron, chemically bonding the dye to the cloth.

The show’s centerpiece is Fraser’s depiction of Buckminster Fuller’s 1930 Dymaxion Map, the first to show a properly proportioned flat map of Earth’s continents. Fraser also works from satellite images or her own aerial photos, although she does a lot less flying and shooting herself nowadays, thanks to Google Earth satellite images.

[email protected] or blogs.newsobserver.com/beat or 919-829-4759

Book Signing on Thursday, June 23 for Global Climate Change: A Primer, Duke University Press

June 7th, 2011


Come celebrate the publication of Global Climate Change: A Primer, co-authored by Orrin & Keith Pilkey with batik art by Mary Edna Fraser, coinciding with the opening of Our Expanding Oceans at the North Carolina Museum of Natural Sciences, Raleigh.  You can buy the book directly from Amazon.com.

Exhibit Premiere, Reception & Book Signing
Opening: Thursday, June 23, 6-9:30 pm

Exhibit dates: June 25-November 6, 2011

North Carolina Museum of Natural Sciences
11 West Jones St., Raleigh, NC 27601
(919) 733-7450, extension 303
naturalsciences.org

Our Expanding Oceans features more than 50 hand-dyed silk batiks by Mary Edna Fraser with explanatory science by Orrin H. Pilkey.

Purchase your tickets to the opening ($10 Friends, $15 General Public) directly from the museum: naturalsciences.org/programs-events/?select=1731

Our Expanding Oceans opening at the North Carolina Museum of Natural Sciences, Raleigh

June 6th, 2011


Exhibit Premiere & Reception
Thursday, June 23rd, 6-9:30 PM

Join us for an exhibit tour, lecture, book signing, live music, light bites, beer and wine.

For more information, visit naturalsciences.org or call 919.733.7450, extension 303.

You can buy tickets ($10 Friends, $15 General Public) directly from the museum at: http://naturalsciences.org/programs-events/?select=1731

The exhibit features more than 50 hand-dyed silk batiks. Developed by artist Mary Edna Fraser and scientist Orrin Pilkey.

Exhibit runs June 25-November 6, 2011.

Preview show of Our Expanding Oceans opens at the North Carolina Museum of Natural Sciences, Raleigh

March 28th, 2011

Our Expanding Oceans

North Carolina Museum of Natural Sciences, Raleigh

June 25 – November 6, 2011

Preview beginning March 23, 2011

Mary Edna Fraser and Orrin H. Pilkey continue their collaboration with the comprehensive art and science installation, Our Expanding Oceans.  Designed to educate about the major elements of global climate change, 60 batiks with accompanying text give an overview of subjects such as sea level rise, ocean acidification, and glacier and sea ice melting.  They examine the content of their newest book co-authored by Orrin’s son Keith Pilkey, Global Climate Change: A Primer, Duke University Press, to be published in June.

Thank you Ricky and Steve for such a great installation!

Homage to Hokusai II hangs next to whale bones

From left to right: Core Banks (NC), Self Portrait, Oak Island (NC), and Flying North

From left to right: Oak Island (NC), Flying North, and Homage to Hokusai II

A portion of Global Perception (seen above) is hanging near the gift shop (pictured below).  It is an adaptation of Buckminster Fuller’s 1930 Dymaxion Map in which major land masses are their relative size on a world globe without grossly distorting shape.

Truly a spectacularly large artwork, on display is only a small section of the batik sculpture thought to be the largest in the world.

Homage to Hokusai II

March 18th, 2011

Mary Edna just completed her depiction of Hokusai’s great oceanic wave. She will be installing this work and other large-scale batiks on silk at the North Carolina Museum of Natural Sciences in Raleigh, NC as a preview for the upcoming comprehensive exhibition, Our Expanding Oceans. In collaboration with geologist Orrin H. Pilkey, the show will examine the content of their book, Global Climate Change: A Primer, Duke University Press, to be published in June.

Our Expanding Oceans

North Carolina Museum of Natural Sciences

June 25 – November 6, 2011

Preview beginning March 23, 2011


Homage to Hokusai II, batik on silk, 53 x 43 inches

“Many of my batiks are prayer flags and Homage to Hokusai II is dedicated to those in the wake of the Japanese tsunami.” -Mary Edna Fraser