Plein Air Magazine features Mary Edna’s oil painting

November 30th, 2016

The October-November 2016 “Shoreline” Expanded Digital Edition Content of Plein Air Magazine featured Mary Edna Fraser’s large scale “Shem Creek Park” oil on canvas.

View the Shoreline, Digital Expanded Edition Content. Mary Edna’s art is on page 2.

Shem Creek Park, oil on canvas, 32" x 83.5"

Shem Creek Park, oil on canvas, 32″ x 83.5″

CATEGORIES: Art Work, News, Oil Paintings |

Anthropocene Magazine features Mary Edna’s batik

October 27th, 2016

An image of Mary Edna Fraser’s batik on silk “Hurricane Katrina” 50.625” x 53.75” was featured on the first page of the inaugural edition of Anthropocene Magazine, October 2016.

Anthropocene Magazine, October 2016, first page spread featuring Mary Edna Fraser's batik on silk "Hurricane Katrina"

Anthropocene Magazine, October 2016, featuring Mary Edna Fraser’s batik on silk “Hurricane Katrina”

"Hurricane Katrina" batik on silk, hanging on a decorative curtain rod in the studio with silk scarves below

“Hurricane Katrina” batik on silk, hanging on a decorative curtain rod in the studio with silk scarves below

Anthropocene Magazine, October 2016, cover

Anthropocene Magazine, October 2016, cover

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CATEGORIES: Art Work, Batiks, Educational, News |

Batik workshop at the University of North Texas

October 25th, 2016

The Fibers Department of the University of North Texas sponsored a 2-day batik workshop for graduate students facilitated by their professor Amie Adelman. The students were amazing. I hope to return to Denton to teach monotyping and have an exhibition.

UNT workshop with Mary Edna Fraser

UNT workshop with Mary Edna Fraser

UNT workshop with Mary Edna Fraser

UNT workshop with Mary Edna Fraser

UNT workshop with Mary Edna Fraser

UNT workshop with Mary Edna Fraser

UNT workshop with Mary Edna Fraser

UNT workshop with Mary Edna Fraser

UNT workshop with Mary Edna Fraser

UNT workshop with Mary Edna Fraser

Hobcaw Barony’s firetower view has come to an end

October 24th, 2016

Hobcaw Barony’s firetower blew down in our recent storm, Hurricane Matthew. It marks the end of an era in my painting. One of my favorite things to do is paint plein air from an elevation point. Here are the first two oils done at Hobcaw Barony from this location. “From the Firetower I” was just acquired by Beth Thomas.

From the Firetower II, oil on panel, framed, 8” x 24”

From the Firetower II, oil on panel, framed, 8” x 24”

From the Firetower I, oil on panel, framed, 12” x 12” SOLD

From the Firetower I, oil on panel, framed, 12” x 12” SOLD

CATEGORIES: Art Work, News, Oil Paintings, Process |

Hobcaw Barony oil paintings

August 17th, 2016

I climbed the firetower in the heat of summer at Hobcaw to make small paintings en plein air for several days. Inspired, I returned to the studio with digital panoramic photographs and produced two large 20″ x 60″ oils on canvas. Email or give a call to come by the studio to see the new work.

Hobcaw Nocturne, oil on canvas, 20" x 60"

Hobcaw Nocturne, oil on canvas, 20″ x 60″

High Tide, oil on canvas, 20" x 60"

High Tide, oil on canvas, 20″ x 60″

Mary Edna Fraser painting in the studio

Mary Edna Fraser painting in the studio

CATEGORIES: Art Work, News, Oil Paintings, Process |

NEW Ashley River 5′ x 3′ silk rug, made in Nepal with Atelier Lapchi

August 12th, 2016

Ashley River, our first rug, has just arrived! Two more rugs translated from batik on silk designs are currently in the works. Please inquire about price or make an appointment to come by the studio. Special orders for custom sizes and unique designs are available. Thanks to Nathan Tucker with his Lapchi Chicago team and the skilled weavers in Nepal for their expertise in producing these high quality rugs.

Ashley River, silk rug, Mary Edna Fraser, Atelier Lapchi Chicago

Each design is a limited edition of 100, numbered and signed by the artist, Mary Edna Fraser. Atelier Lapchi uses true Chinese silk, a renewable resource, dyed in small batches with Procion MX dyes, the same chemistry that Fraser uses for her original batiks on silk. Cotton sourced in Kathmandu, where the rugs are made, provides the warp and weft fibers onto which the silk is hand knotted. No latex or any coating is applied to the back, making a more environmentally friendly rug that will not yellow or harden, becoming an antique over time. Each loop knot is wrapped tightly around its warp and weft, making a beautiful enduring backing, finished with panels of cotton hand-sewn for a protective edge.

Each rug is certified by Goodweave.org to ensure that no child labor is used in the making of the product. Educational programs funded by Goodweave.org help children through “rehabilitation, day-care, literacy, formal schooling and vocational training” and they cite 3,700 children freed from the textile industry through their efforts.

Ashley River, 3' x 5', silk rug,  Mary Edna Fraser, Atelier Lapchi, 2016

Ashley River, silk rug, Mary Edna Fraser, Atelier Lapchi Chicago, Goodweave.org

Ashley River, 3' x 5', silk rug, Mary Edna Fraser, Atelier Lapchi, made in Nepal, 2016

Ashley River, 5′ x 3′ silk rug, Mary Edna Fraser, Atelier Lapchi, made in Nepal, 2016

Mary Edna’s “Waterscapes” mentioned in the Island Packet

July 7th, 2016
Shem Creek Park, oil on canvas, floating, 32” x 83.5”

Shem Creek Park, oil on canvas, floating, 32” x 83.5”

The article “Lowcountry artists have big things happening in Charleston” by Nancy K. Wellard was published by the Island Packet on July 6, 2016. Fraser’s exhibition at Diamonds Direct, a fundraiser for Charleston Waterkeeper, was described by Wellard:

And then move on to “Waterscapes,” an exhibit of stunning, monumental batiks on silk, along with some new oil paintings by artist, Mary Edna Fraser, who spent a number of years pursuing her artistic focus on Hilton Head Island.

She now works daily in her studio, nestled in a wooded setting, just 10 minutes off the beaten track from downtown Charleston. Happily, she remains in close touch with island galleries, artist friends, particularly, and continues to expand the portrayal of her artist’s focus about her reverence and appreciation for our planet, generally, and its waterways, specifically.

A collection of her astonishing batik work, “Waterscapes,” was selected by Charleston’s Diamonds Direct, to be featured in the inaugural exhibit in their location. The thrillingly intimate, strikingly personal show is fully in place, and you must take in every piece.

The younger Mary Edna Fraser, developed her appreciation for waterways, and the way they converge at water’s edge, forming patterns with fingers of land, when she peered down from the side of the open cockpit of a small airplane. That unusual perspective, many years ago, contributed completely to her interest, in her adult years, to a greater understanding and appreciation for our Lowcountry settings.

Over time, Fraser’s interest in representing those perspectives artistically, led to her now acknowledged and award-winning, monumental work in batik — batik on silk, particularly.

“Batik is a process that started in Java, and predates written records,” Fraser said. “It’s a dye resist process in which I apply removable wax to fabric, in my case, silk. I create areas that will repel dye while the unwaxed areas will absorb my color choices.”

Recently, satellites and space imagery have further expanded Fraser’s range of content to the extent that she has added barrier islands, river deltas, mountains, glaciers and landscapes to her body of work, with astonishing technical precision.

“But most especially, I work from my own aerial photograph — oh, and with maps and charts,” she said.

Apart from the vibrant and light-filled beauty we all find in her batik work, she has been recognized by the Planetary Geologists of NASA and the Smithsonian Institute for her artistic accomplishments.


The exhibition is open through August 22, 2016 at Diamonds Direct, 1911 Hwy 17 N, Mount Pleasant.

Homage to William Morris II, batik on silk by Mary Edna Fraser, 57.5" x 14"

Homage to William Morris II, batik on silk by Mary Edna Fraser, 57.5″ x 14″

“Waterscapes” at Diamonds Direct to benefit Charleston Waterkeeper

June 21st, 2016

Waterscapes at Diamonds Direct, benefit for Charleston Waterkeeper

Opening today June 21, 2016 and running through August 22, 2016, the exhibit “Waterscapes” will benefit Charleston Waterkeeper. A portion of proceeds go to the non-profit organization with Diamonds Direct charging no commission on the sale of art. Mary Edna Fraser has been an ongoing supporter of the work of Charleston Waterkeeper and currently building a coalition to improve the water quality of her creek on James Island. Batiks on silk and new oil paintings grace the showroom space.

Waterscapes at Diamonds Direct, benefit for Charleston Waterkeeper

Waterscapes at Diamonds Direct, benefit for Charleston Waterkeeper

Installation of “The Power of Nature” at MUSC College of Nursing

May 17th, 2016
The Power of Nature, oil on linen, 32” x 83.5”, installation by Celie Dailey at MUSC's College of Nursing

The Power of Nature, oil on linen, 32” x 83.5”, installation by Celie Dailey

In the collection of MUSC’s College of Nursing, this oil on linen of a storm on Sullivan’s Island had special appeal to Dean Gail Stuart whose textbooks on psychiatric nursing seek to deal with the mind and body holistically. The tumultuous waves in the painting create a panoramic window in the institutional space. Stuart has featured Fraser’s images—batiks of outerspace, monotypes and moonscapes—in three editions of her Principles and Practice of Psychiatric Nursing, published by Elsevier in 2004, 2009 and 2010. This is Fraser’s first large scale work of art in oil.

Blue, Blue Planet installation at Out of Line Gallery, Chicago

April 30th, 2016

Mapanare blog posted about the short exhibition Blue, Blue Planet in Chicago featuring Mary Edna Fraser, Michelle Stone, and Diane Jaderberg at Ayala Leyser’s Out of Line Gallery.

Mary Edna Fraser installation at Out of Line Gallery, Chicago

Mary Edna Fraser installation at Out of Line Gallery, Chicago

Mary Edna Fraser installation at Out of Line Gallery, Chicago